Om Telolet Om: What Is Its Meaning? Goes Viral On Social Media

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

Om Telolet Om: Everybody who doesn’t know what Om Telolet Om means is searching the internet as it is going viral on social media sites. Twitter users from Indonesia have been tweeting it for last 12 hours. That’s the hashtag #OmTeloletOm became one of the trending topics.



It’s a meme which made its first appearance on Facebook around a month ago. It’s another meaningless funny local meme who got international attention. On Tuesday night, professional DJs began to pick up on the Indonesian “telolet” meme with producer/DJ Zedd’s tweet, and it became viral.

The beautiful sound of bus honk sound is unique and all of a sudden some major DJs picked and started tweeting about it, the OmTelolet Om. On the other hand, Oliver Heldens thought it was “omelet” when he got to know about it. Apart from him, The Chainsmokers also didn’t know about its meaning.

Even, Firebeatz came up with a mixed response to the Om TeloletOm discussion.

Billboard came around after doing its homework on this growing sound. They speculated about its presence in future dance anthems.

Do you know the meaning of Om Telolet Om? Where does it come from?

In November this year, the videos of Indonesian children and youngsters got loaded on the social media. The videos were of the kids standing on the streets of Ngabul, Jepara, Central java, and were shouting “omteloletom!” at the passing inter-province buses. This phrase means “Sir, honk you horn, sir”. So, the drives used to honk their horns due to which the telolet sound produced and the children cheer in glee.

The video appeared on facebook on November 26 and since then, it has been viewred over one million times and shared more than 44.4 thousand times on FB itself.

The common comment was “It doesn’t take much money to be happy, just wait for the buses and ask them to honk.” A large number of people got entertained watching the happiness of the children.

This phenomenon created traffic jams in the Jepara area. Thus, the Jepara Police had to intervene and ask the bus drivers not to accept those requests of making telolet sound. However, an investigation took place to measure the honking sound if it’s out of limit. But, it was found that the honking sound remained with a tolerable range of 112. The lowest was 9 DB (A), and maximum being 118 dB (A).

The videos of “telolet hunters” appeared in some regions of Central Java in the present time.

Share.

Comments are closed.